What Can You Buy with Bitcoin?

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This year has been something of a watershed, with a number of merchants – some of them retail giants with billions of dollars in revenue – deciding to accept bitcoin in exchange for goods and services. Many of them are online e-commerce sites, but an increasing number of bricks-and-mortar stores are also now accepting cryptocurrency. While in the past trying to find a bitcoin-accepting merchant for the item you want was often tricky or even impossible, there are now growing options for people who don’t wish to pick their way through hundreds of listings just to find products vaguely approximating those they want. The best way to find bitcoin-accepting merchants is via marketplaces and aggregatorsites that gather large numbers of supporting establishments together at once. CoinMap.org also offers a visual way to locate bitcoin stores in any geographical area, and new businesses are appearing all the time. However, CoinDesk has summed up some of the more notable examples of both online and real-world stores in the guide below. Spending your bitcoin In previous guides, we’ve told you how to mine bitcoin, and how to buy it. However you acquired your digital currency, if it’s not purely an investment, you’re going to want to spend it at some point. So, what can you buy with …

How Can I Buy Bitcoins?

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Last updated: 23rd December 2014 Now you’ve realized bitcoin is the money of the future, the next step is to get some bitcoins. But how? This guide will tell you what you need to know. You can buy bitcoins from either exchanges, or directly from other people selling them. You can pay for them in a variety of ways, ranging from hard cash to credit/debit cards to wire transfers, or even with other cryptocurrencies, depending on who you are buying them from and where you live. Surprisingly, it’s still not easy to buy bitcoins with your credit card or PayPal. This is because such transactions can easily be reversed with a phone call to the card company (ie: ‘chargebacks’, one of the problems bitcoin is here to solve). Since it’s hard to prove any goods changed hands in a transfer of bitcoins, exchanges avoid this payment method and so do most private sellers. However, the options have recently grown for consumers in some countries. In the US, Coinbase, Circle, Trucoin and coin.mx all now offer purchases with cards. Bittylicious and CoinCorner also offer this service in the UK, accepting 3D Secure-enabled cards on the Visa and MasterCard networks. For small amounts of bitcoin, you can use a card to buy $20-worth at …